Eddie Sexton Trusts the Washington Post Enough to Allow Them to Download His Phone. Why?

Even though Eddie Sexton,  the former attorney for Roy Moore accuser, Leigh Corfman, only represented his client for a few days prior and up to the November 9th, 2017 Washington Post article being published, his testimony in a recent deposition reveals his first hand account of the media frenzy that he and his client endured at the onset of what became a series of poll shifting allegations that contributed to Doug Jones’ razor thin margin of victory or Roy Moore back in December of 2017.

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Roy Moore speaks to the media. Image courtesy of Alabama Political Reporter

In the deposition, Sexton details the sudden influx of reporters at his office. Sexton was representing Corfman during the hours following the publishing of an article in the Washington Post that contained allegations of sexual assault by Roy Moore.  Sexton explained that he thought his client needed a PR agency instead of an attorney. Below is his reason why:

“Because I had 30 reporters in my parking lot, and I had them blowing up my phone. I had them staked out at my house. I had them staked out at my farm. I had them calling my wife’s cell phone, sending e-mails, Facebook messages, calling friends trying to get me to come in, trying to break in the office.”

The attention even got to the point that Sexton had to take covert measures just to leave his office.  Sexton testified:

“I actually had to leave and go out the back door because they were, like, blocking in my truck and stuff. So, I actually left and got — I think I took somebody else’s car because I was going to some function with Bill Baxley or for Bill Baxley. And so, I went and changed clothes at — at the bathroom at Sonic so I could come back and — and go to that thing without getting attacked by the media.”

Reporters even pushed their way into his office:

“So, during that intervening time when everybody was pounding on the door and screaming and yelling at the windows, one of the Al.com reporters pushed his way into — through the door when somebody else came in, and I brought him back to the conference room where I was to talk to him so that the receptionist and everybody wouldn’t be freaking out thinking that something bad was about to happen. So, I got him back there and talked to him for, like, four minutes and then sent him out. But he reported then that I was representing Leigh as her lawyer at that time, and I was. So, once he did that, then I knew that I couldn’t then say, oh, no, I am not representing her, because I knew how Breitbart and them, at that point, would report on it, and I didn’t want something negative to happen to Leigh or something adversely — potential — something that was potentially adverse to her.”

Notice in the above excerpt how Sexton decided not to reveal to the media his decision to no longer represent Corfman.  This decision was made in the frenzy that occurred during the hours just after the WaPo article came out on that same day.   His reasoning for this was, “because I knew how Breitbart and them, at that point, would report on it, and I didn’t want something negative to happen to Leigh or something adversely — potential — something that was potentially adverse to her.”  Did Sexton view “Breitbart and them” as a media outlet (or outlets) that were seeking to negate or offset the WaPo story that had just come out about the allegations of sexual assault by Roy Moore?

This is the first thing that puzzles me about this.  If Sexton viewed Breitbart as being “potentially adverse” to Corfman and he was willing to keep his decision to no longer represent her from the media on November 9th, why then did he agree to attend a meeting with Breitbart reporters just a few days later?  A November 13th meeting where Sexton claims he was offered money and a chance to meet Steven Bannon?  Wait what? Bannon=Breitbart back in those days!

Now having read that, let’s fast forward to March of 2018.

In my last post, I reported that Sexton actually allowed reporters to “download” his phone.  The information obtained was used as supporting material for an article that was published in March of 2018 in The Washington Post. Here is what Sexton told attorneys when asked about him allowing WaPo to download his phone.

“Q All right. So, if you had any communications on that phone with Leigh Corfman, they would have downloaded that?

A No, yeah. No, that is what I am saying. Everything — there is nothing that is deleted that we can’t recover or I can’t recreate and verify that that is where it came from and what happened to it.

Q Okay. So — so, I am saying is, if there were communications between you and Leigh Corfman on that phone, The Washington Post has it anyway, correct?

A Yeah, but I am pretty sure there weren’t.”

Readers think about this for a moment.  Make a list of people that you would trust to download your phone?  If I had to guess that list would be a short one and only include the most trusted people in your life.  Why would an attorney from Alabama allow a Washington D.C. paper such access?

I welcome your comments.

Author: Duncan Lindsey

blogcaster at-large

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